Surprising Reasons You May Be Experiencing Pain

Believe, it or not, the following are possible pain triggers:  Flip flops, smart phones, your wallet, driving, active video games, cheese (bummer, because I love cheese), couch potato syndrome, your baby, etc…

 http://www.webmd.com/pain-management/ss/slideshow-reasons-for-pain

EAT Your Fruits and Veggies, Or Better Yet, Juice Them!

I stumbled upon this gem when I was on the way home from some out call massages in Davis earlier this year.  Since I’ve incorporated daily juicing into my healthy lifestyle, it’s my weekly go-to now for an amazing selection of fruits and vegetables.  If you are considering juicing, I would recommend the following documentaries:  Fat, Sick and Nearly Dead, Food Matters and Food, Inc. to name a few.  A good book to read about the benefits of juicing with several recipes, Juicing for Life.

If you want locally grown, fresh and inexpensive local produce and live in the Yolo area, not to mention a nice variety of nuts, dried fruits and Greek, Italian and Persian foods – this is the place to go.

Great article: http://www.theaggie.org/2010/05/18/yolo-fruit-stand-picks-fresh-produce-for-locals/

4 out of 5 star Yelp reviews: http://www.yelp.com/biz/yolo-fruit-stand-el-macero

 

Reviewing a Business

 

Yelp is a very valuable online resource to access to find great businesses.  Personally, I get most of my business from referrals and an online search for my website.  Beyond that, my Yelp listing is where I obtain most of my new business.   I use Yelp all of the time, in town, and when I am on vacation.  This resource has never let me down.  For example, while vacationing in Canada this summer, by checking in to local businesses, I met a Yelp employee via Yelp who gave me several great tips about restaurants, museums, etc.  I did discover very quickly Canadians don’t yelp as much as Californians do so that’s why I probably stood out when I was yelping.

Here are a few tips when using this resource.  When you do search for businesses, look at the overall star rating of a business.  The more reviews there are, the stronger likelihood there will be some negative reviews.  If the majority is positive, you should be good to go. 

If you feel inspired to write a positive review of a business, please write more than one sentence.  It is helpful if you could take some time and write a thoughtful review – think about what sets the business you are reviewing apart from all others?  If you feel compelled to write something negative, please take a day to think it over.  I have witnessed where people have really ripped into a business unnecessarily. Why not pick up the phone and address your concerns with the business owner?   

Be aware that if you don’t log on to Yelp regularly or write reviews, any reviews that you do write, might get filtered.  To view filtered reviews of any business, scroll to the bottom of the reviews, click on filtered and once you enter Captcha code, you will be able to read all of the filtered reviews.  Yelp filters reviews for a variety of reasons.  I don’t particularly agree with all of the filtering methods.   http://www.yelp.com/faq#which_to_filter 

 

 

 

Massage your Pooch!

Have your dog lie on a soft surface, although very small dogs can be done sitting or crouching on your lap. Start with several soft, slow strokes from head to tail. When your dog begins to relax, scratch gently behind the ears, moving to the cheeks, under the chin, over the nose, between the eyes and over the head. Rub each ear several times between your thumb and forefinger, working from base to tip.

Using three fingers, move slowly over the neck, shoulders, and chest in small, circular patterns, gently pinching folds of any loose skin in these areas. Lightly squeeze down the length of each foreleg, then place three fingers on each side of the leg and softly rub opposite directions several times. If your dog is comfortable with having his feet handled, use your thumb and forefinger and give each foot a couple of soft squeezes. This is a good time to look out for any burrs, ticks, or skin abnormalities. Use common sense in avoiding wounds, lumps, rashes or any sore spots your dog may have.

The second phase of the massage can include placing your thumb and index finger on each side of the spine and ‘walking’ them toward the base of the tail, and then the outside of each thigh. You may also squeeze the length of the tail and move down the rear legs in the same way as on the front legs, if your dog doesn’t protest. If at any point, your dog resists, respect his wish and move to the last area or technique he enjoyed. Finish up with several soft, slow strokes from head to tail.

Remember, deep dog massage should be done only by a trained and certified practitioner so it’s very important to always keep your massage light and gentle. When you finish, your dog will most likely be napping peacefully and you may be surprised to find your own tensions melted away also.

How Much Do I Tip My Massage Therapist?


Tips are never expected, but always appreciated.  If you feel that you have received exceptional service and would like to show your appreciation to the therapist, the average tip ranges between 15-25%.  From a therapist’s perspective, it is always nice to receive the compliment of a “thank you for good service” gratuity. If paying with a credit card or check, the tip can be added to the total.  If your therapist is scheduled to provide an outcall massage, and is expected to schlep a table and associated equipment, a gratuity is more inclined to be expected and greatly appreciated. Any tip given with a genuine smile and a ‘thank you’ is better than nothing at all.

Have mercy!

Have you had a hard day traveling, or at work? Do you feel a little grumpy? Were you sharp or impatient with someone?

Well, guess what! People in service industries don’t always have great days either. Show them a little mercy and assume the best about them. Maybe your massage therapist is off the mark because a family member is sick in the hospital.

Instead of skipping the tip, give your therapist a break.  We are all human.

Coupons and gift certificates

If you received a coupon or gift certificate, how much should you tip? Tipping is always based upon the normal price of the service. If you get a coupon for 25% off, then tip on the original price. The amount of work done by the therapist is not less because you paid less. If you have a coupon for a free massage, then tip based upon the regular price of the session.

If you have a gift certificate for a massage, inquire if the gratuity is included. If it is not, ask for the estimated value of the gift certificate, and then tip in cash based upon that amount.

But the service is already so expensive!!

With proper tipping etiquette, the percentages of your tips do not change because of the cost of the service. Let’s take a hair salon, for example. Of course, you can always tip on the lower end of 10-20%. But if you are going to go to a more expensive salon, then it is assumed that you can afford $120 plus tip. If it is really a big crunch for you, then I would recommend going less often or finding a salon that is more within your budget.

Tipping the Owner

Do you tip the owner of a company when he or she provides your service. The answer is yes.

Christmas Holiday Tipping Etiquette

Christmas is a great time of year to remember those people who serve you regularly. Since it only occurs once a year, holiday tipping can be a source of holiday stress, but it need not be so. I recommend a gift or a tasteful Christmas card with a tip inside. Delivery should occur in the month of December prior to Christmas day. Tip those who serve you all year long and with whom you have a personal relationship.

  • Massage therapist – $15 or more. Read more about tipping massage therapists at www.frappydoo.com.

 

Some Small Businesses I Recommend

I have lived in Sacramento for the past fifteen years.  I LOVE to support fellow small businesses, having had my own business for 12 years.  Here is a partial listing of businesses I highly recommend.   If you do decide to utilize any of these businesses, please mention my name.

http://www.alainntu.comHeather Ramsey, Aesthetician (Facials and waxing)

http://www.faceandbodysacramento.com/default.aspDeborah Luckowicz, Aesthetician (Facials and threading)

http://www.lifetimemakeup.com/Marina Ramos, Aesthetician (Microdermabrasion treatments)

http://secrets-salon.net/Wendy Lansdon (Permanent Makeup)

http://canvassalonboutique.com/ and  http://www.maribouspasalon.com/folsom/Tasha Gibbs (Eyelash Extensions)

http://www.blossomhairsalon.net/Blossom_Hair_Salon/Welcome.htmlRebekkah Frost (Hairstylist/Makeup Artist)

http://www.padmecenter.comSophie Levy, Owner (Yoga)

http://www.seotechmasters.com/Sean Odom, Owner (SEO services)

www.ramblingrita.comMandy Tardiff  (Artist, specializing in hand painted murals, face painting, children’s book illustration)

http://www.goldkuhl.com/Ed Goldkuhl, Esq.  (Estate/Probate Planning Attorney)

http://www.numberqueen.com/Home_Page.htmlAmy Cedusky (Enrolled Agent)

http://www/carmichaelfamilydentistry.comRichard C. Yee, D.D.S (General and Cosmetic Dentistry)

http://www.lasikworld.comGuy Seydel, O.D. (Optometrist)

http://www.rdiwebsite.com/Marcelo Rosetti, President  (Full service Graphic Design)

http://firstsolutionsinc.netScott Colvin, Owner (Security systems, fire alarms, access control, closed circuit television, computer networking wiring, fiber optics, telephone systems)